Love, it’s like getting into a bath, but the water is warm chocolate pudding. And The Smiths are playing “There’s a Light That Never Goes Out.” oh. There’s warm lighting all over and there’re like five dudes massaging you.

Love, it’s like getting into a bath, but the water is warm chocolate pudding. And The Smiths are playing “There’s a Light That Never Goes Out.” oh. There’s warm lighting all over and there’re like five dudes massaging you.

Love, it’s like getting into a bath, but the water is warm chocolate pudding. And The Smiths are playing “There’s a Light That Never Goes Out.” oh. There’s warm lighting all over and there’re like five dudes massaging you.

(via huffingtonpost)

“Books don’t offer real escape, but they can stop a mind scratching itself raw.”
— David Mitchell, Cloud Atlas (via wordsnquotes)

(via wordsnquotes)

My kids are starting to notice I’m a little different from the other dads. “Why don’t you have a straight job like everyone else?” they asked me the other day.

I told them this story:
In the forest, there was a crooked tree and a straight tree. Every day, the straight tree would say to the crooked tree, “Look at me…I’m tall, and I’m straight, and I’m handsome. Look at you…you’re all crooked and bent over. No one wants to look at you.” And they grew up in that forest together. And then one day the loggers came, and they saw the crooked tree and the straight tree, and they said, “Just cut the straight trees and leave the rest.” So the loggers turned all the straight trees into lumber and toothpicks and paper. And the crooked tree is still there, growing stronger and stranger every day.

natgeotravel:

There are two visible architectural landmarks in this night photo from Prague. Find out if you know the answer »

Photograph by René Jakl, Spectrum Pictures

latimes:

People buying homes in a development in Brea have the option of including a 170-square-foot “pet suite.” The suite includes a tiled washing station with leash tie-downs and a hand-held sprayer, a pet dryer, a cabinet with built-in bedding, a stackable washer/dryer combo (separate from the human laundry room), a flat-screen TV and a patio door that opens to a dog run.
Photo: Dogs check out a “pet suite” in Brea. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times) latimes:

People buying homes in a development in Brea have the option of including a 170-square-foot “pet suite.” The suite includes a tiled washing station with leash tie-downs and a hand-held sprayer, a pet dryer, a cabinet with built-in bedding, a stackable washer/dryer combo (separate from the human laundry room), a flat-screen TV and a patio door that opens to a dog run.
Photo: Dogs check out a “pet suite” in Brea. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

latimes:

People buying homes in a development in Brea have the option of including a 170-square-foot “pet suite.” The suite includes a tiled washing station with leash tie-downs and a hand-held sprayer, a pet dryer, a cabinet with built-in bedding, a stackable washer/dryer combo (separate from the human laundry room), a flat-screen TV and a patio door that opens to a dog run.

Photo: Dogs check out a “pet suite” in Brea. (Mark Boster / Los Angeles Times)

huffpostbooks:

Writing would be so much easier if there were clear, easy-to-follow rules: insert Tab A into Slot B, stir counterclockwise, and bake at 350 degrees for 20 minutes. Novices often look to more experienced writers for the secret of their success. These writers usually trot out platitudes and time-worn advice (Be yourself! Show, don’t tell!) or ironic non-advice (Use a pencil!).

It seems that every great author has compiled a list of writing rules at some point in their careers. Ray Bradbury offers up a dozen rules, Kurt Vonnegut recommends eight, and Henry Miller created eleven commandments. The Gotham Writers Workshop has a treasure trove of advice from famous authors.

The late Elmore Leonard wrote an essay for the New York Times that included his ten rules for writing:

1. Never open a book with weather.
2. Avoid prologues.
3. Never use a verb other than “said” to carry dialogue.
4. Never use an adverb to modify the verb “said”…he admonished gravely. 
5. Keep your exclamation points under control. You are allowed no more than two or three per 100,000 words of prose. 
6. Never use the words “suddenly” or “all hell broke loose.”
7. Use regional dialect, patois, sparingly.
8. Avoid detailed descriptions of characters. 
9. Don’t go into great detail describing places and things. 
10. Try to leave out the part that readers tend to skip.

(via huffingtonpost)

allthingseurope:

Széchenyi thermal bath, Budapest (by *celina)